Over Tim Foreman

Tim Foreman

Tim Foreman

The quote on the desk of Tim Foreman in his office at the European R&D headquarters of Omron in Den Bosch reads: "If you want to go fast go alone, if you want to go far go together". Omron's European R&D Manager is a team player who really feels at home in the international and multicultural environment at Omron, where he started back in 1993 as a Software Engineer. 'I had just finished my PhD on “Bottom quark production at the Z resonance” after being involved at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) in Geneva on behalf of the Dutch National Institute for Subatomic Physics-Nikhef', Tim explains. 'During that period I experienced the dynamics of working in an international setting. Omron offered me the chance to continue that experience. Furthermore, the high ethical standards of Omron and its mission to develop new technology that benefits society really appeal to me.' 'At Omron I was able to put my skills obtained by my PhD and MSC in Physics from Utrecht University to practice. I held a variety of positions from Project Leader, and Group Leader to Development Manager', Tim adds. In 2007 he was appointed to his current position as European R&D Manager. His passion for innovation resulted in contributions to three European patents and many new product developments.
Send Tim Foreman an e-mail

Artificial Intelligence

Edge, Fog and Cloud clarified

What do the terms Edge, Fog and Cloud mean in relation to artificial intelligence in industrial manufacturing? They are actually different layers of the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT). Here is a quick overview on how we at Omron describe these terms in relation to AI, using an analogy with a nervous system. Edge: Spinal
Artificial Intelligence

Smart machines: laying the golden egg?

Greater manufacturing efficiency: it’s the golden egg we’re all looking for. But it’s getting increasingly hard to find. The solution could be smarter automation, which involves lots and lots of data (‘big data’) and data collection and data-driven modelling. The smart machine then uses the models to automatically adjust its own behaviour (i.e. machine learning).